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Peter Bauhuis

Casting is the method of choice for German goldsmith Peter Bauhuis. The tactile surfaces of his jewelry and vessels are rough and uneven, revealing the ghosts of the wax models that gave them life. Bauhuis utilizes silver, gold, copper, and zinc, oftentimes creating alloys, which produce uniquely colored shapes and sketches on the objects’ surfaces. His forms are primal, sensual, and talismanic – inviting touch, fondling. The void is as imperative as the form; brooches and bowls sometimes have holes; the hollow backs of brooches may reveal an inner web.

Bauhuis has been inspired by blobs and orifices, so-naming respective series’. Rings can sport vessels as miniaturized examples informed by his larger works. He sometimes channels natural phenomena such as Physalia – jellyfish that drift along the surfaces of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans or Armillaria Mellea – the honey fungus whose characteristic mushrooms sprout from huge underground and, consequently, unseen networks that symbolize, for Bauhuis, the interconnectedness of ideas, making, and things. He flaunts highly sculptural surfaces that emphasize the process of hand-modelling. Trained as a goldsmith, Bauhuis received his diploma from the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. He was the recipient of the Bavarian State Award (2011); Danner Competition Prize of Honor, Munich (2005); and Friedrich Becker Prize, Dusseldorf (2001), along with several others. His jewelry and vessels are represented in many public collections including Schmuckmuseum, Pforzheim; Die Neue Sammlung, Munich; Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne;  and Fonds national d’art contemporain, Paris.     

Casting is the method of choice for German goldsmith Peter Bauhuis. The tactile surfaces of his jewelry and vessels are rough and uneven, revealing the ghosts of the wax models that gave them life. Bauhuis utilizes silver, gold, copper, and zinc, oftentimes creating alloys, which produce uniquely colored shapes and sketches on the objects’ surfaces. His forms are primal, sensual, and talismanic – inviting touch, fondling. The void is as imperative as the form; brooches and bowls sometimes have holes; the hollow backs of brooches may reveal an inner web.

Bauhuis has been inspired by blobs and orifices, so-naming respective series’. Rings can sport vessels as miniaturized examples informed by his larger works. He sometimes channels natural phenomena such as Physalia – jellyfish that drift along the surfaces of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans or Armillaria Mellea – the honey fungus whose characteristic mushrooms sprout from huge underground and, consequently, unseen networks that symbolize, for Bauhuis, the interconnectedness of ideas, making, and things. He flaunts highly sculptural surfaces that emphasize the process of hand-modelling. Trained as a goldsmith, Bauhuis received his diploma from the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. He was the recipient of the Bavarian State Award (2011); Danner Competition Prize of Honor, Munich (2005); and Friedrich Becker Prize, Dusseldorf (2001), along with several others. His jewelry and vessels are represented in many public collections including Schmuckmuseum, Pforzheim; Die Neue Sammlung, Munich; Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe,...

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