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Yael Friedman

Israeli artist Yael Friedman states that she views jewelry as an interactive art form - sculptures that call upon the wearer to touch and explore with the jewelry becoming a toy and the wearer playing a role in the game. As in the mathematical patterning of M.C. Escher, an artist she cites, Friedman believes that regarding jewelry within the context of gaming opens up its vista to infinite possibilities, altering the very rules of jewelry design.

Friedman often explores paper to mirror traditional jewelry formats and techniques that typically utilize metal. In the Granulation series, she formulates in paper the ancient process of granulation, whereby minute gold spheres are fused to gold sheet (without solder), creating an area of contiguous orbs. To achieve this end, Friedman cuts small paper squares into two sizes, soaks them in water, and then rolls them into tiny balls, which harden after drying. She then methodically glues them onto predesigned rings of Bristol paper.

Friedman holds a Master of Arts in art history from Ben Gurion University, Beersheba, and a Master of Design and Bachelor of Arts from Bezalel Academy of Art in Jerusalem, Israel. In 2016 she was a Visiting Scientist in the Living Mobile Group, MIT Media Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. She received Honorable Mention at the Cheongjiu International Craft Biennale, Cheongjiu, Korea in 2013; and was awarded the 2011 Israeli Design Award from the Ministry of Culture and Sports in Israel. Her work has been included in several books on contemporary jewelry, and she has shown in many exhibitions worldwide. In 2014 Friedman had a solo exhibition at the progressive CBK art space in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Israeli artist Yael Friedman states that she views jewelry as an interactive art form - sculptures that call upon the wearer to touch and explore with the jewelry becoming a toy and the wearer playing a role in the game. As in the mathematical patterning of M.C. Escher, an artist she cites, Friedman believes that regarding jewelry within the context of gaming opens up its vista to infinite possibilities, altering the very rules of jewelry design.

Friedman often explores paper to mirror traditional jewelry formats and techniques that typically utilize metal. In the Granulation series, she formulates in paper the ancient process of granulation, whereby minute gold spheres are fused to gold sheet (without solder), creating an area of contiguous orbs. To achieve this end, Friedman cuts small paper squares into two sizes, soaks them in water, and then rolls them into tiny balls, which harden after drying. She then methodically glues them onto predesigned rings of Bristol paper.

Friedman holds a Master of Arts in art history from Ben Gurion University, Beersheba, and a Master of Design and Bachelor of Arts from Bezalel Academy of Art in Jerusalem, Israel. In 2016 she was a Visiting Scientist in the Living Mobile Group, MIT Media Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. She received Honorable Mention at the Cheongjiu International Craft Biennale, Cheongjiu, Korea in 2013; and was awarded the 2011 Israeli Design Award from the Ministry of Culture and Sports in Israel. Her work has been included in several books on contemporary jewelry, and she has shown...

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